Sorry? What Do You Have to Be Sorry About?

Don’t apologize for being who you are. You’re just the way God made you.

Don’t be sorry for being a woman, a man, your race, nor having brown hair, blonde hair, blue or brown eyes. For those are the things that make you you. Be happy and secure with it.

Don’t apologize for being a Christian, Muslim, Buddhist, nor for holding certain values- for valuing your god and family. For those are the things you hold dear.

Refuse to be sorry for wrongdoings committed by others. You cannot control others’ actions, nor should you be expected to pay for their sins. That is between them and God, and they’ll be judged for it one day.

You’re not responsible for any sins other than your own.

Too many people self-loathe and feel guilty for things they haven’t done, which only strips away their happiness and peace of mind. And if you allow others to heap false guilt on your head unjustly, what do you think they will do next?

Take charge of your happiness and your life. And know that anyone who tries to force you to feel something you shouldn’t feel or do something that is either degrading to you or that you don’t want to do, you should have no more to do with them.

Continue to love yourself. Apologize only for what you’re guilty of and to the person you transgressed against. And if that person doesn’t accept your apology, that’s on them, and you should love yourself enough to get on with it.

13 thoughts on “Sorry? What Do You Have to Be Sorry About?

  1. This! I used to apologize because I had an online stalker… as though it was my fault, or my baggage. But the person would bother my friends online (back then FB) and I felt it was my duty to apologize. It was a crappy situation. Sigh.

    Anyway, thanks for bringing this up! Have a wonderful weekend 🙂

  2. Pingback: Sorry? What Do You Have to Be Sorry About? – Tonya LaLonde

  3. I learned to say sorry from my mother. She was sorry when it rained, sorry when we lost something, sorry for the actions of our friends, even. I learned to stop saying sorry when I left my exam husband. I left the other doormat there, too.

    • I can relate. Many of us are raised to be polite and kind and that’s not a bad thing. However, when it goes so far as to mold us into footstools for others, that’s when it becomes a problem. Only back in your mother’s day, people didn’t think of this- nobody did. We’re products of our upbringing.

  4. Thanks for your article. We get used to say sorry in many situations, and we just can’t get rid of this habit. Maybe it is because our culture teaches us to be polite. But the most importing thing is that we shouldn’t be sorry for our values or something that we believe, and you are right about this.

    • Thank you so much. And I couldn’t agree more. Also, if you’re raised by parents to be polite and, at the same time, to ignore other people’s rudeness and meanness, or, in my case, “to be lady-like,” it’s even a harder habit to break. My family meant well, don’t get me wrong. But back when I was growing up (70s and 80s) people didn’t know as much about the dark side of human nature and bullying as they do today.

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